ARTT 353: Elements of Photography

This course is an introduction to the technical and theoretical aspects of the photographic image. Emphasis will be placed on photography as a fine art medium, with some reference to its popular and commercial use.

The course objectives are to introduce the student to the technical aspects of photography through the production of black and white photographs produced exclusively in the wet darkroom. Students will be expected to demonstrate an ability to effectively use a 35mm camera, in manual over-ride mode, and to independently develop and print high quality black and white photographic prints.

In addition, students will be introduced to theory involving the communicative nature of the photographic image. Students are encouraged to pursue independent readings, video, slide, and multimedia presentations by published photographers.

Please refer to "Marking System" in the Undergraduate Catalogue for an explanation of grades.

During the last week of class, students will make a 15 minute presentation on their group projects. There will be two written essays and a final technical and theoretical exam. All students will participate in the final critique.

Students are expected to be on time for all lecture, lab, critique, and exams. A written note from the health clinic must be submitted for excused sick absences and prior approval is required for any late work in order to receive credit. Students are expected to have access to a properly functioning 35mm camera within the first two weeks of class.

*Students who require classroom modifications due to special learning needs are required to meet with campus officials for proper paperwork and evaluation. Contact Disability Support Service (301-314-7682 University counseling Center, Shoemaker.

"Marking System" in the Undergraduate Catalogue provides a complete explanation of the overall grading system. For specific guidelines for this class, please refer to classroom handouts

 

ARTT 489F: Explorations in Traditional and Digital Photographic Processes

This is an intermediate level photography class that will integrate traditional analogue wet darkroom studies with digital technology. Students will upload and/or capture digitized images via scanner or optical and digital cameras utilizing Macintosh computers in the Computer Science Center Teaching Theater lab. Adobe Photoshop software technology with be used for editing and image manipulation. Mid semester, students will output with various ink dyes onto a variety of photographic and fine art substrate printing materials. Students with the prerequisite 353 may use the Marie Mount Photographic darkroom lab for traditional black and white film development and printing.

During class time the teaching theater enables independent and cooperative explorations. Technical concepts are demonstrated and practiced utilizing the Teaching Theater's data projector as students work on imagery from the work stations. Campus WAM labs and the Art Department EMC labs are available for digital assignments, and the Marie Mount darkroom is available for students with prereqs to complete photographic work.

Specific technical studio skills once only available through trial and error with chemicals can now be analyzed through graphs and charts (histograms and numerical feedback) as students experiment with contrast and tonal density in their artistic explorations. Pertinent theoretical concepts will be discussed along with technical critique.

In addition, students will be introduced to theory involving the communicative nature of the photographic image. Students are encouraged to pursue independent readings, video, slide, and multimedia presentations by published photographers.

Basic Workflow Techniques include
Collection and Capture
Camera Operations, Analogue/Traditional
Scanning of Transparency/Reflective
Analysis, Software Editing, and Image Manipulation
Dissemination for print and Web

Academic Evaluation includes
Technical quiz
Midterm Theoretical paper and final essay
Final print presentation
Classroom behavior performance and Darkroom Lab behavioral performance

During the last week of class, students will make a 15 minute presentation on their group projects. There will be two written essays and a final technical and theoretical exam. All students will participate in the final critique.

Students are expected to be on time for all lecture, lab, critique, and exams. A written note from the health clinic must be submitted for excused sick absences and prior approval is required for any late work in order to receive credit. Students are expected to have access to a properly functioning 35mm camera within the first two weeks of class.

*Students who require classroom modifications due to special learning needs are required to meet with campus officials for proper paperwork and evaluation. Contact Disability Support Service (301-314-7682 University counseling Center, Shoemaker.

"Marking System" in the Undergraduate Catalogue provides a complete explanation of the overall grading system. For specific guidelines for this class, please refer to classroom handouts

 

ARTT 449: Advanced Photography
Independent Study
Teaching Assisting

This course is designed for students who are interested in working independently and have experience and proficiency in advanced camera operations, black and white wet darkroom, or digital image editing. Students contract to work on a project during the semester in close collaboration with the instructor. Students must negotiate a specific Contract Proposal within the first 2 weeks of class

Opportunities include

Advanced black and white darkroom
Studio Lighting Sessions
Field projects for photojournalistic, commercial, electronic, and fine art photography
Community Exhibition for the class including organizing, planning, advertising, and hanging a final show at the end of the semester
In class teaching assisting
Out of class lab assisting

Students are expected to produce a thematically cohesive portfolio of work exhibiting an advanced level of creative and technical skill acquisition. As they are to submit a written theoretical piece describing the work

Students are encouraged to pursue independent readings, video, slide, and multimedia presentations by published photographers.

Students will be evaluated based on quality of completed assignments

*Students who require classroom modifications due to special learning needs are required to meet with campus officials for proper paperwork and evaluation. Contact Disability Support Service (301-314-7682 University counseling Center, Shoemaker.

"Marking System" in the Undergraduate Catalogue provides a complete explanation of the overall grading system. For specific guidelines for this class, please refer to classroom handouts